Thursday, August 25

Indie Choices: Writing in Multiple Genres or Specializing

By Marcy Kennedy, @MarcyKennedy
 

Part of the Indie Author Series

One of the empowering, amazing parts of being an independent author is we get to choose. That ability to choose and experiment is one of the things that drew me to self-publishing rather than trying to work with a traditional publisher.

A lot of the choices we make won’t have a right and a wrong. Instead, they’ll have a right for me and a wrong for me. What’s important is that we understand our options and select the one that suits us.

Wednesday, August 24

Blog Tour Stop: 5 Reasons Your Plot Stalled


Hi gang!

Today's stop on the Better Fiction Blog Tour visits Jody Hedlund's blog, with 5 Reasons Your Plot Stalled (plus there's another chance to enter the critique giveaway). Come on over and say hello!

In case you missed them, here are the other stops so far on the tour:
 Where to Find Ideas at Query Tracker
The Benefits of Story Structure at Writability
Stuck on Your Novel? Start With the Ending at Jami Gold's blog
Using Internal Conflict to Create Plot at Writers in the Storm
Is Your Novel Character or Plot Driven? at Lynn Coulter's blog
Finding the Balance Between Hooking Readers and Setting up the Story at Romance University
5 Common Plotting Mistakes to Avoid When You're Writing a Novel at The Write Life

Tuesday, August 23

The Importance of Genre Specific – Part One

By Susan Brooks, @oosuzieq 

Part of the How They Do It Series

Knowing where your book fits into the market helps readers find those books. Although the terms often used interchangeably, genre and market are not the same. Editor Susan Brooks takes the podium today to help clarify how they differ, and how they affect a writer's chances at selling a novel. Please help me give her a big welcome.

Since 2009, Susan has served on the board of directors for Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers, a non-profit educational organization supporting both published and aspiring writers of commercial fiction. She holds a master’s degree in publishing from George Washington University and is Editor in Chief at Literary Wanderlust, a new, small traditional press located in Denver, Colorado.

She tweets once in a while and you can follow her as @oosuzieq on Twitter. She also writes a weekly blog on writing craft and other writing topics which you can find at The Writer's Bag of Tricks.

Take it away Susan...

Monday, August 22

Blog Tour Stop: 5 Common Plotting Mistakes


Hi gang!

Today's stop on the Better Fiction Blog Tour stops at The Write Life to look at five common plotting mistakes you might be making (plus there's another chance to enter the critique giveaway). Come on over and say hello!

In case you missed them, here are the other stops so far on the tour:
 Where to Find Ideas at Query Tracker
The Benefits of Story Structure at Writability
Stuck on Your Novel? Start With the Ending at Jami Gold's blog
Using Internal Conflict to Create Plot at Writers in the Storm
Is Your Novel Character or Plot Driven? at Lynn Coulter's blog
Finding the Balance Between Hooking Readers and Setting up the Story at Romance University

Tell Your Inner Editor to Calm the #$@! Down

By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy

In our crazy modern world, the desire (and expectation) for instant perfect is high. We want things to work right the first time, regardless of what those “things” are. They might be gadgets, relationships, or even our words.

This is especially tough on us writers.

A first draft is all about imperfection and getting ideas down. It’s where we make our mistakes and run down dead ends and cause a mess. It’s where the creativity happens.

Sunday, August 21

Writing Prompt: The Photo Prompt: Angry Girls.

By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy 

This week’s prompt is a photo prompt. Write whatever comes to mind, be it a description, a story, or even a poem.

I'm babysitting this weekend, so this photo is inspired by my niece and nephew (grin).

Write something inspired by this photo. 



Saturday, August 20

Real Life Diagnostics: Does This Third-Person POV Suspense Opening Work?

Critique By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy

Real Life Diagnostics is a weekly column that studies a snippet of a work in progress for specific issues. Readers are encouraged to send in work with questions, and I diagnose it on the site. It’s part critique, part example, and designed to help the submitter as well as anyone else having a similar problem.

If you're interested in submitting to Real Life Diagnostics, please check out these guidelines.

Submissions currently in the queue: Four 


Please Note: As of today, RLD slots are booked through September 17.

This week’s questions:

1. This is the first time I've written in 3rd person and past tense. Is it done correctly?

2. Do you get an emotional connection with the MC?

3. Does this opening work for a suspense novel?


Market/Genre: Suspense

On to the diagnosis…

Thursday, August 18

"Going Wide" - Gaining Traction on non-Amazon Vendors Part 1: The Upload Process

By Angela Quarles, @AngelaQuarles

Part of the Indie Author Series


I see a lot of indies frustrated when they try to "go wide" by distributing to non-Amazon vendors, but then panic when they don't see immediate results and pull their books back to being exclusive on Amazon. I wanted to tackle this topic because there are ways to get traction at these other vendors, but it does take time. But first, a primer on how to set up at the various vendors, because each can be confusing, and some extremely difficult (I'm looking at you Google).

Wednesday, August 17

Blog Tour Stop: Finding the Balance Between Hooking Readers and Setting up the Story


Hi gang!

Today's stop on the Better Fiction Blog Tour is with the awesome folks over at Romance University, where it's all about finding the balance between hooking readers and setting up the story (plus there's another chance to enter the critique giveaway). Come on over and say hello!

A Quick Tip for Finding Repeated (and Weak) Words

By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy

Unless you’re a brand-new reader to the site (and if so, Hi! Welcome), you know I love lists, especially when it comes to editing and revising. Lists help keep me organized and remind me of tasks I need to do—and frequently forget. One item on my regular edit list is: fix duplicate words.

These three words cover several issues, but it’s a quick reminder to look for words that are:

A. Used too much

B. Used too close together