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Friday, February 7

Janice Hardy Events and Workshops for 2020

By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy

This year's event schedule isn't as hectic as last year's--though I suspect more will be added before we get further into 2020. If you're looking for some in-person craft workshops, give one of these a try.

Here are the conferences I'll be at and the workshops I'll be teaching (so far):

February 20-21: Florida Heritage Book Festival Writers Conference


Renaissance Marriott World Golf Village Resort St. Augustine, FL

February 20: Full Day Workshop 8am-4pm: Kicking Your Writing Up a Notch

It’s not uncommon for writers to hit a point where they know their writing is good, but it’s not where they want it (or need it) to be. They could use a little help to push their skills and story to the next level, but they’re not sure how to get that push or where to apply it in their manuscripts. In this workshop, you’ll learn ways to improve your writing and story developing skills to take your novel from nice to “Wow!” From macro-level structure techniques, to micro-level word choices, this full-day of exercises and tips will dig into your writing and polish the gems within. Bring your laptop or pages and be ready to write!

February 21: Understanding the Scene: The Engine of Your Story

Scenes are the building blocks of a novel, but they don't always unfold the way we want them to. In this workshop, you'll learn the mechanics of scene and its troublesome partner, the sequel, and how to use this pairing to drive your story. You'll also learn how to develop scenes and weave them together to build strong and focused plots, as well as what to do when you story grinds to a halt and you don't know why.

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March 13-14: SCBWI Southern Breeze wik20 Writing and Illustrating for Kids


Homewood Public Library, 1721 Oxmoor Rd., Birmingham, AL

March 13 Intensive: Half-Day Workshop

Plot, Setting, Scene: Building a Strong Foundation for Your Novel (Half-or Full-Day Only)


Stories might be about characters, but those characters need things to do and places to do them in. Creating a compelling plot with strong conflicts played out in an interesting setting is half of writing a great novel, and the foundation for your entire story. In this workshop, writers will learn how to use internal and external conflicts to plot, and how to tell if they need a character arc or not. They’ll also learn tricks to bring their setting to life, discover how to background details to enhance the setting, and show, not tell, their story world. And finally, they’ll dig deep into the mechanics of scene and its troublesome partner, the sequel, and learn how to use this pairing to drive the story and create plots (and novels) readers won’t be able to walk away from. This workshop is packed full of exercises, so bring your laptop and pages.

March 14: Workshops 

Finding the Plot in Your Premise


What starts out as an exciting premise can sometimes leave us banging our heads against a wall by page fifty, wondering what went wrong. But a little effort before we start writing can mean the difference between stuck and soaring. In this workshop, you’ll learn techniques to test your premise or idea and see if it really does have what it takes to fill an entire novel. Learn basic plotting tips for both pantsers and outliners, and discover what you need to start that novel and keep yourself on track. No matter what your process is, you’ll learn ways to determine if that premise has the legs to carry the novel in your head. With hands-on exercises, so bring your laptop or pages!

Public Speaking for Writers who Hate Public Speaking

For many writers, the thought of speaking to a room full of people makes them break out into a cold sweat. Unfortunately, being an author means at some point, you’re likely to find yourself in the spotlight. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to choose events that minimize the fear of speaking in public, tips on shifting focus off you, and how to stay “in the public eye” even if you never leave your house.

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June 14: Citrus Crime Writers, Orlando chapter of Sisters in Crime.


Winter Park Public Library, Orlando, FL  

Workshop TBD.

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July 11: First Coast Romance Writers


West Branch Library in Jacksonville, FL

Muddling Through the Middle

The “boggy middle” has claimed many a writer, but with a little planning and forethought, writers can sail right through it. In this workshop, you'll discover why the middle is such a troublesome chunk of the novel, and how it’s really where all the fun happens in a story. You’ll also learn how to avoid getting sucked into the mire, what to do keep your pace moving, and some nifty plotting tricks to help you create stronger story arcs and conflicts.

Finding the Plot in Your Premise

What starts out as an exciting premise can sometimes leave us banging our heads against a wall by page fifty, wondering what went wrong. But a little effort before we start writing can mean the difference between stuck and soaring. In this workshop, you’ll learn techniques to test your premise or idea and see if it really does have what it takes to fill an entire novel. Learn basic plotting tips for both pantsers and outliners, and discover what you need to start that novel and keep yourself on track. No matter what your process is, you'll learn ways to determine if that premise has the legs to carry the novel in your head. With hands-on exercises, so bring your laptop or pages!

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August 22: FWA Ponte Vedra Beach


Revision Readiness: How to Revise

Revision is part of writing, but sometimes knowing where to start can be overwhelming. It can be even harder if you need to trim down a large manuscript or change a major storyline. In this workshop, writers will learn how to approach their revisions with a plan, focusing on macro, medium, and micro issues to tighten their novel on a layer by layer basis. They’ll also learn how to mentally approach revisions, and how to strengthen their story from the top down.

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